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Tom Seest

January 8, 2024

Can You Eat Plant-Based Cuisine In Taiwan?

Travel and Diet | 0 comments


Uncovering Taiwan’s Tasty Plant-Based Delights

By Tom Seest

Can You Eat Plant-Based Cuisine In Taiwan?

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If you are planning a trip to Taiwan, then you may be wondering how you can eat plant-based food. There are many ways to do this. For starters, there are several traditional desserts in the country. Some of them include Yiihotang, Shao Bing, and Turnip cakes. In addition, you can also find soy milk and Vegan food.

Can You Eat Plant-Based Cuisine In Taiwan?

Can You Eat Plant-Based Cuisine In Taiwan?

Discover the Secret to Authentic Taiwanese Cuisine: Yong He Soy Milk

Soy milk is a staple of East Asian cuisines. It is produced by grinding soybeans and filtering out particulates. In Taiwan, soybean is used in a variety of food items, including soy sauce, edamame, and tofu.
Yong He Soy Milk King is a popular breakfast spot in Taipei. Their menu includes fried dough sticks and classic Taiwanese breakfast items. The shop is open 24 hours a day, so there’s no shortage of options for those on a time crunch. They also have an English menu.
One of the most common breakfast options in Taiwan is a steamed sticky rice bowl known as muai gui. This is often served with a sweetened doujiang. There’s even a specialty ai yu jelly. Ai yu is a plant-based dessert that’s made from seeds from a fig.
In Taiwan, you’ll find several vegan-friendly restaurants and food stalls. DeliSoys is a vegan Chinese restaurant that features a variety of dishes. While they do not offer an all-vegan menu, many of the ingredients are sourced from Taiwan.
For those looking for something a bit more exciting, there’s Zi Zhu Can. The largest vegetarian buffet in Taipei, the restaurant’s menu changes daily, so it’s a good choice if you’re hungry and adventurous. However, the prices can be steep.
Ximending Yong He Soy Milk is also a must-visit for those looking for a traditional Taiwanese breakfast. Open all day, it’s a popular spot that draws both locals and tourists.

Discover the Secret to Authentic Taiwanese Cuisine: Yong He Soy Milk

Discover the Secret to Authentic Taiwanese Cuisine: Yong He Soy Milk

Have you tried the delicious Yiihotang in Taiwan as part of your plant-based diet?

If you’re looking for a place to eat vegan food in Taiwan, you’ve come to the right place. This country has a huge number of restaurants, cafes, and bakeries that serve vegan and vegetarian dishes. It’s the perfect place for vegetarians and omnivores to enjoy a delicious meal together.
Many of the most popular Taiwanese desserts are made without dairy. Pineapple cake, Mango Fraisier, Caramel Apple Crumble, and Cheese Bagel are just a few of the popular options.
Another Taiwanese favorite is bubble tea. Bubble tea is a hot drink that is usually made from tea. However, it also comes with other ingredients, such as milk and sugar.
You can find a wide variety of vegetarian restaurants and street food in Taipei. For example, Xin Hong Shu Shi Liao Li Can Ting is an all-vegan Chinese restaurant located in Ximending. Alternatively, you can visit Vege Creek, a restaurant that is 100% vegan and has several locations in and around Taipei.
Tofu is a common ingredient in many Taiwanese cuisines. However, it isn’t always labeled as vegetarian. Traditionally, it was not part of the Chinese diet.
Another popular vegan food in Taiwan is the king trumpet mushroom bun. Served with a rich batter, the king trumpet mushroom is deep-fried to perfection.
There are a number of other foods and snacks that are available throughout the day and night. In the evening, a stroll through one of the city’s many night markets is a great way to get a taste of the local vegan options.

Have you tried the delicious Yiihotang in Taiwan as part of your plant-based diet?

Have you tried the delicious Yiihotang in Taiwan as part of your plant-based diet?

Discovering Delicious Vegan Options in Taiwan’s Countryside

BaganHood is a burgeoning vegan restaurant in Taipei. Its menu boasts a number of dishes that you won’t be disappointed by. The food is well-crafted and tasty, if not exactly cheap. They have a menu of salads, pizzas, burgers, and more.
One of their best offerings is the Unicorn Sensation, a concoction of shaved ice, popping candy, boba, and vegan cream. It’s not something you can get at home, and it’s probably not for the calorie-conscious.
The Xinyi District has a few other vegan restaurants to choose from. If you don’t mind a 15-minute walk, check out Daan Forest Park, which is a quaint little park that features some of the city’s best raw food.
Other noteworthy options include the Da’an branch of Ice Monster, which serves up the Unicorn Sensation. There’s also the Blosson Rena, which is a small shop specializing in the latest in vegan food. Besides their menu, the shop sells some great skin care products.
The Xinyi district also has a number of other notable vegan and vegetarian spots to try. In the Taipei foodie department, you can try the food-centric udon shop Hoshina, the vegan-friendly Blosson Rena, or the Michelin-starred eatery Lian Bu Chi Dan Nai De. For something to eat, it’s a good idea to book a table in advance.
While the name BaganHood might be a mouthful, it’s one of the trendiest vegan and plant-based places in Taipei.

Discovering Delicious Vegan Options in Taiwan's Countryside

Discovering Delicious Vegan Options in Taiwan’s Countryside

Are Turnip Cakes the Secret to Plant-Based Success in Taiwan?

Turnip cake is one of the most popular traditional Chinese dishes. It is served during the Chinese New Year and is usually pan-fried. You can buy turnip cakes at a supermarket, but you can also make them at home.
Traditionally, turnip cake is made with shredded radish, cornstarch, dried shrimp, and rice flour. These ingredients provide the turnip cake with texture and flavor. Other traditional ingredients include sugar, salt, and Chinese sausage.
To prepare the turnip cake, you will first need to grate the radish into fine strips. Then, you will cook the radish in water until it is wilted. Once wilted, the radish can be served with fried shallots and dried shrimp. If you want to add a little more umami to your turnip cake, you can add shiitake mushrooms and Chinese sausage.
Turnip cake is often steamed before it is served. This provides a crispy outer layer and a soft interior. During the cooking process, the turnip cake should be covered with a lid or steamer. After steaming, the turnip cake can be cut into thick slices.
You can find turnip cakes in a Chinese supermarket. They are sold in small packets, which are easy to carry. Aside from the ingredients listed above, you will also need a non-stick skillet with vegetable oil.
You can pan-fry or steam the turnip cake. Pan frying is more common because it gives the turnip cake a crisp outer layer. In a skillet, it takes approximately 3 to 4 minutes per side. Alternatively, you can steam the cake for 30 to 40 minutes.

Are Turnip Cakes the Secret to Plant-Based Success in Taiwan?

Are Turnip Cakes the Secret to Plant-Based Success in Taiwan?

Who Else Wants to Taste the Delicious Shao Bing in Taiwan?

If you’re visiting Taiwan, you’ll want to know how to eat plant-based food here. This is because the island has plenty of vegan restaurants and street food. Whether you’re looking for something sweet, spicy, or savory, you’ll find what you need.
One of the easiest ways to eat plant-based food in Taiwan is to visit a night market. Many markets will have plenty of stalls that serve the same food. They can be found all over the country. You can also use the apps listed below to help you find a vegan restaurant.
Another popular Taiwanese dessert is a pineapple cake. It is filled with pineapple jam. The dough is a thin bread, usually made with soy milk.
One of the most common breakfast foods in Taiwan is fan tuan. A rice roll, fan tuan is normally wrapped in plastic. Modern versions are often made with different colored rice and come with a variety of fillings. Some of the fillings include braised egg, pickled radish, and pork floss.
Stinky Tofu (Chou Dou Fu) is another food to try. It is made of fermented tofu that is moist and has a nice aroma. In some places, it’s served with fish and other ingredients.
Another dish that’s popular in Taiwan is douhua. This is a soft tofu dessert that’s often served with black sugar syrup.
Sweet Potato Balls are a snacking favorite in Taiwan. These sweet and chewy balls are often sold almost everywhere.

Who Else Wants to Taste the Delicious Shao Bing in Taiwan?

Who Else Wants to Taste the Delicious Shao Bing in Taiwan?

Indulge in Authentic Taiwanese Sweets: A Plant-Based Twist?

Traditional desserts in Taiwan are a reflection of the nation’s dedication to tradition and creativity. These delectable treats have gained popularity across Asia. If you’re a die-hard fan of Taiwanese cuisine, make sure to keep your eyes peeled for some of the best local desserts.
One of the most popular Taiwan desserts is the pineapple cake. These sweet, spongy cakes are sold in decorative boxes and are a great souvenir or gift. They are also available at a cheap price.
Another Taiwanese dessert you’ll want to try is douhua. This is made from silky tofu and is normally vegan. It is served with black sugar syrup and various toppings. Most basic versions have peanuts as the main ingredient. But you can find many different varieties to suit your taste.
The Chinese and Japanese influence is apparent in many traditional Taiwan desserts. Mochi, which is a white, fatty Q-texture ball, is often stuffed with sweet fillings. And you’ll find tangyuan, a rice flour cake, in both sweet and savory versions.
Shaved ice is another Taiwanese dessert that is perfect for hot summer days. Shaved ice is typically a block of flavored ice that is shaved into ribbons or powder. Many of the best street vendors in Taiwan offer a variety of flavors.
Mung bean pastries are another traditional Taiwanese dessert. These sweet and savory treats are usually stuffed with mung bean paste. In the past, this filling consisted of lard, shallots, and pork. Today, this filling is often made of sweetened mung bean paste.

Indulge in Authentic Taiwanese Sweets: A Plant-Based Twist?

Indulge in Authentic Taiwanese Sweets: A Plant-Based Twist?

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