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Tom Seest

December 15, 2023

Can You Eat Plant-Based In Western Sahara?

Travel and Diet | 0 comments


Feast on Plant-Based Delights In Western Sahara

By Tom Seest

Can You Eat Plant-Based In Western Sahara?

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The Western Sahara, as a country, is known for its rich flora and fauna. This is a region where agriculture is very important, and the diets are largely plant-based. Increasing the population’s diets to include more fruits and vegetables will certainly improve the country’s health, as well as help reduce its carbon footprint.

Can You Eat Plant-Based In Western Sahara?

Can You Eat Plant-Based In Western Sahara?

Can Eating Plant-Based in Western Sahara Reduce Carbon Footprints?

Changing diets from meat to plant-based diets has a high potential for reducing carbon footprints in Western Sahara, a disputed territory in Morocco. It also presents a range of ethical benefits.
Several studies have assessed the extent to which changes in dietary patterns can lead to win-win outcomes for sustainability. These studies compare traditional diets with vegetarian and vegan diets and assess how these changes may affect the environment. Compared to conventional dietary patterns, changes in diets can reduce food-related greenhouse gas emissions by 29-70%. The results of these studies can be used to develop country-specific strategies for sustainable dietary behaviors.
Dietary factors are one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality. Over two billion people suffer from malnutrition. Dietary change can improve health and contribute to achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that the United Nations has set out.
One of the main barriers to dietary change is the difficulty of giving up meat. In addition, it is often expensive to buy plant-based meals. However, these concerns have been addressed through the development of new protein-rich food alternatives. Plant-based protein sources include seitan, tofu, and soy products.
Many plant-based diets have been shown to decrease the risk of developing diseases. They are also linked to lower levels of body fat, reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, and decreased rates of cancer and aging. Other benefits of a plant-based diet include the presence of essential nutritional ingredients.
Livestock products have the highest GHG emissions per unit of product. This is a result of the inefficiency of plant protein conversion and the use of additional emissions from enteric fermentation. Additionally, livestock production produces more GHG emissions than crops, largely due to feed inputs.
Diets that are predominantly plant-based have the lowest emissions per kilogram. These include fruits, vegetables, grains, pulses, and nuts.
In addition to these benefits, there are several other health and ethical benefits of a plant-based diet. For example, a diet consisting mainly of fruits, vegetables, and legumes decreases the occurrence of certain cancers, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Furthermore, a diet that is predominantly plant-based may be able to promote peace and reduce conflict in the world.

Can Eating Plant-Based in Western Sahara Reduce Carbon Footprints?

Can Eating Plant-Based in Western Sahara Reduce Carbon Footprints?

What Impact Does Eating Plant-Based Have on Western Sahara’s Climate?

Dietary changes have been proposed as a key strategy to achieve the UN’s climate change targets. They include reducing the carbon footprint associated with food production. While these changes can be useful, they also have their own downsides. It’s important to be aware of the potential health impacts of changing your diet.
Generally, a plant-based diet is healthier for your body. In addition, it saves more CO2 than meat-based diets. Meat is not the only culprit; highly processed and processed foods are also linked to major health issues such as high blood pressure and heart disease.
Food systems are the largest consumers of freshwater resources worldwide. This is especially true in countries with a large population. These areas often experience water shortages because of the over-production of foods and the associated trade. However, by switching to more water-efficient foods, we could reduce the impact on freshwater systems.
Studies have found that shifts to diets that are healthier for us have the largest impact on greenhouse gas emissions. For example, switching to a vegan diet can save 8 billion tonnes of CO2 equivalent per year. Other studies have reported that vegetarianism reduces emissions by 20-60 percent. Plant-based diets are also better for aquatic ecosystems. If more of us adopted such diets, we would be doing our part to reduce ocean acidification, the main contributor to ocean acidification.
A recent study found that shifting to an ultra-flexitarian diet, which is mostly plant-based, can save 5.5 billion tonnes of CO2 equivalent per year. The diet also helps to avoid the slaughter of billions of animals.
The transition to more healthy plant-based foods also has the potential to reduce the agricultural land needed to grow these foods. This would help stop deforestation and allow for the reforestation of large areas. Reforestation would become a natural store of carbon dioxide.
In fact, there are more ways to save on the climate-friendly side of things than just switching to a more plant-based diet. Some examples include trade agreements that improve the water-use efficiency of imported crops and local agricultural expansion through novel crop and horticulture systems.

What Impact Does Eating Plant-Based Have on Western Sahara's Climate?

What Impact Does Eating Plant-Based Have on Western Sahara’s Climate?

Can Plant-Based Diets Reduce Nitrogen & Phosphate Use in Western Sahara?

Phosphorus is a key component in fertilizer. Agricultural research has shown that plants require more phosphorus than was previously thought. But while it is a valuable resource, it is also rapidly depleting.
A recent study has analyzed the phosphorus consumption of the average American consumer. The results were the product of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) software test. It is a statistically sound way to measure the efficiency of a given nutrient in a particular crop. Using LCA, the researchers compared the use of various nutrients to determine the optimum balance of phosphorus, nitrogen, and potassium.
In short, the most important component in a phosphorus-based fertilizer is not the phosphorus itself but the amount of aeration required to convert reactive nitrogen species into nitrogen gas. And aeration is a very energy-intensive process.
While the most efficient way to apply nitrogen is the “Haber-Bosch” process, aeration is not the only way to obtain the desired result. Another way is to use compost and animal manure. These are both viable alternatives to importing phosphate rock. However, both methods are subject to a host of regulatory and economic barriers.
Other alternatives include using a combination of mineral additives, inorganic compounds, and microorganisms to dissolve phosphorus and make it available to plants. This is particularly relevant for the phosphorus from animal manure. Among other benefits, a plant-based diet is said to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.
Considering the number of companies producing fertilizers, there is no shortage of options. There are six companies with market caps in the tens of billions of dollars. They include Nutrien, Wesfarmers, CF Industries, AZ Minerals, SABIC Agri-Nutrients, and BASF. Some of them have joined forces to form the largest agricultural consortium in the world.
It should come as no surprise that the most important element in a phosphorus-based fertilizer can be a tricky beast. Aeration has its advantages, but the sheer volume of aeration required to turn a molecule of phosphate into a usable fertilizer is not an easy task. To make matters worse, phosphate rock has a highly unequal distribution.

Can Plant-Based Diets Reduce Nitrogen & Phosphate Use in Western Sahara?

Can Plant-Based Diets Reduce Nitrogen & Phosphate Use in Western Sahara?

Is Eating Plant-Based in Western Sahara Harming Aquatic Life?

There is a need for sustainable agriculture practices, which can improve water use efficiency and reduce food-related carbon emissions to help meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Specifically, nutrient pollution of aquatic systems is driven by over-application of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers in agriculture. These nutrients are released in nutrient runoff from cereal crops and in the eutrophication of coastal waters. By adopting dietary changes to decrease the water requirements of various foods, we can avoid the eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems, thereby protecting the health of marine life.
The current food system uses the largest amount of global freshwater resources and is the greatest single user of water in the world. This unsustainable water use is exacerbated when regional freshwater resources are mismatched with food production scales. Food trade, in particular, contributes to this issue. As trade increases, it is important to maintain a balance between supply and demand. A more efficient trade can help sustain environmental flows, especially where the volume of agricultural produce and the region’s regional freshwater supply is insufficient for the needs of a particular market.

Is Eating Plant-Based in Western Sahara Harming Aquatic Life?

Is Eating Plant-Based in Western Sahara Harming Aquatic Life?

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