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Tom Seest

December 28, 2023

Is The Keto Diet Better Than The Stillman Diet?

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Keto Vs. Stillman: Which Diet Wins?

By Tom Seest

Is The Keto Diet Better Than The Stillman Diet?

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The Stillman diet and the ketogenic diet are two diets that are very popular. Both diets help people lose weight, but how do they compare? These diets also have other benefits, including improving glycemic and lipid controls for people who already have diabetes. They may also impair the growth of certain types of cancer.

Is The Keto Diet Better Than The Stillman Diet?

Is The Keto Diet Better Than The Stillman Diet?

Weight Loss Benefits of Increased Insulin Sensitivity?

Using a ketogenic diet to increase insulin sensitivity to weight loss can be effective, although the literature is not conclusive. This is due to the nature of these diets, which are high in fat. However, long-term adherence to such a diet may have a negative impact on glucose homeostasis.
As with any dietary change, individuals should talk with their doctor to learn more about the potential risks and benefits of this dietary approach. It is recommended that those using this diet closely monitor their blood sugar levels. If their blood sugar reaches 250 mg/dL or above, they may be at risk for developing euglycemic DKA.
The ketogenic diet induces ketosis, a state in which the body uses fat as fuel. Ketones are produced when glucose is broken down in the liver. They can be used by nearly all tissues in the body and are associated with improving insulin sensitivity.
A low-carb ketosis-inducing diet is an option for patients with type 1 diabetes. The diet contains less than 10% carbs.
These diets also improve insulin sensitivity in obese women. However, they do not appear to be as effective in women who are overweight. Moreover, it is unclear whether ketogenic diets increase the risk of dyslipidemia, which occurs in those with high cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
Ketones may also be beneficial to patients with other metabolic conditions, including diabetes. In particular, ketones can reduce cellular aging and improve insulin sensitivity.
Insulin resistance is a condition in which cells in the body fail to respond to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that enables the liver to convert glucose into glycogen. It then promotes lipid storage in adipose cells, triglyceride synthesis, and lipolysis inhibition. When the body’s insulin receptors become insensitive to insulin, skeletal muscle is inhibited from taking up glucose, and the brain is also deprived of a portion of its glucose. Consequently, ectopic fat is deposited in non-adipose organs.
In the context of type 2 diabetes, ketogenic diets have been shown to lower HbA1c. There have been limited studies that examine the effect of these diets on the metabolic profile of people with metabolic syndrome.

Weight Loss Benefits of Increased Insulin Sensitivity?

Weight Loss Benefits of Increased Insulin Sensitivity?

Can the Ketogenic Diet Outperform the Stillman Diet for Diabetes Patients?

The development of diabetes self-management programs has had a positive impact on the care of patients with diabetes. These programs have resulted in improvements in glycemic, weight, and lipid controls. However, there is also a need to consider the role of telemedicine case management in improving glycemic and lipid control.
Telemedicine case management can increase glycemic and lipid control, reduce hospitalizations, and improve the psychosocial well-being of patients. This has also been shown to be beneficial in ethnically diverse patients with diabetes.
A one-year intensive self-management healthy behaviors program was associated with statistically significant weight loss and improved A1C. The intervention was also associated with reduced waist circumference. It is likely that older people with diabetes would benefit from an intensive self-management program with a geriatric team.
Insulin sliding scales are commonly used in long-term care (LTC) facilities without sufficient evidence. Sliding scale insulin is associated with poorer glycemic control. Therefore, LTC residents with diabetes should avoid sliding-scale insulin.
Physical activity has also been shown to be important in improving glycemic and fatty acid profiles. Exercise programs have also been shown to decrease falls, improve balance, and reduce the risk of neuropathy. Nevertheless, exercise programs can be inconsistent with glucose metabolism.
Intensive glycemic control is not appropriate for people with chronic or longstanding diabetes. In the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study, elderly patients with diabetes were found to have increased mortality. Moreover, people with severe hypoglycemia are at higher risk of cognitive impairment.
Those with diabetes should be encouraged to participate in a supervised resistance training program. Resistance training may help improve body composition, balance, and glucose and triglyceride levels. Compared with low-fat diets, ketogenic diets are more effective in achieving improved metabolic parameters. Using a ketogenic diet, triglyceride levels are significantly lower.
Similarly, antihyperglycemic agents should be restricted in older people with hypertension or hypoglycemia. For these patients, antihyperglycemic therapy should be discontinued.
In order to prevent complications, it is important to adhere to glycemic targets. Several strategies should be employed to achieve these targets. Antihyperglycemic agents with a low risk of hypoglycemia should be used.

Can the Ketogenic Diet Outperform the Stillman Diet for Diabetes Patients?

Can the Ketogenic Diet Outperform the Stillman Diet for Diabetes Patients?

Can the Ketogenic Diet Help Combat Certain Types of Cancer?

Ketogenic diets are a type of low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet that is used in patients to help reduce cancer growth. These diets deprive the body of carbohydrates and replace them with protein, lipids, and fat. Several studies have explored ketogenic diets’ effect on tumor metabolism.
Cancer cells are characterized by a number of genetic and metabolic factors. They have dysfunctional mitochondria, which results in a decrease in ATP production. This may also contribute to their tumor growth. A study from MIT suggests that dietary interventions can change the metabolite levels in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, they might be beneficial as adjunct therapies to other drugs.
In an in vitro study, researchers looked at selective energy metabolism impairment in tumor cells. They found that ketogenic diets caused distinct changes in amino acid metabolism and increased hydroxylation of sphingomyelins. However, this did not slow the growth of pancreatic tumors.
In a melanoma model, ketogenic diets induced apoptosis, or cell death, and reduced the number of metastases. Although they did not limit lipid production, they decreased the adipic acid and alpha-amino adipic acid, two biomarkers of cancer. Among other effects, ketogenic diets also repressed the expression of several genes involved in oxidative stress.
Despite these findings, there is still a great deal of research to be done. Nevertheless, there are positive indications for the use of ketogenic diets in cancer therapy. One of the major obstacles is patient initiative and adherence. There are also several safety concerns. For example, the low-fat, low-sugar nature of the diet could lead to an imbalance in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fats.
Studies have also examined how a caloric restriction diet can slow tumor growth. While some studies have shown that this may help prevent tumor progression, others have reported that it can have harmful side effects.
Researchers studied the effects of both caloric restriction and ketogenic diets on pancreatic tumor growth in mice. Both diets reduced the amount of fatty acids and adipic acid in the blood, but calorie restriction was more effective.
Another study looked at the effect of a ketogenic diet on glioma. The ketogenic diet induced a decrease in the expression of natural AMP-dependent protein kinase activators and a decrease in the activity of the AMPK, an enzyme that suppresses tumor proliferation.

Can the Ketogenic Diet Help Combat Certain Types of Cancer?

Can the Ketogenic Diet Help Combat Certain Types of Cancer?

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